Submission Series Results Feb 2

Once again, the St. Albert army delivers! The submission series was a huge success despite record freezing temperatures and after some very tough matches we came out with not only medals but also some very valuable learning experiences. Monitor Stephanie even competed for the first time and came home with a gold medal! Tournaments are important not only for competitors but also for self defense. You can learn and drill techniques in the dojo but the nerves of competing in tournaments provide the missing piece – the emotional and psychological demands of a self defense situation. Tournament season is back in full swing and we’ve got a lot to do!

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!
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Great Job at Spar Wars Everyone!

Last weekend the St. Albert army was out in force at Spar Wars. In fact, despite being the newest and smallest Arashi-Do locations we had one of the best turn-outs! We had nine first-time Muay Thai competitors and twelve BJJ competitors, and took home a bunch of medals but more importantly everyone fought their hearts out with great performances in tough matches!

It’s impossible to fully explain the feeling of martial arts competition to those who haven’t done it before, but suffice to say it is both thrilling and nerve-wracking at the same time and it takes a great deal of courage even to get out there regardless of result. Thank you to everyone who came out and represented our school so well, we could not be prouder!

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!

Spar Wars January 12th, 2019

Happy new year everyone! We are getting right back into the swing of things with a tournament on the 12th. Spar Wars is Arashi-Do’s in-house tournament and is a great first tournament! Divisions are available for both kids and adults in all three styles Arashi-Do teaches. For more information, head over to http://arashido.com/news-events/events/event/8641-spar-wars-edmonton-and-area-club-tournament .

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!

The Psychology of New Years Resolutions

It’s almost that time of year again! On and around January 1st, many peoples’ thoughts will turn to what kind of 2018 they want to have and what positive choices they can make in order to improve their chances. In his article, “The Psychology of New Years’ Resolutions”, Professor of Behavioral Addiction Mark Griffiths lays out the following helpful tips:

Be realistic. You need to begin by making resolutions that you can keep and that are practical. If you want to reduce your alcohol intake because you tend to drink alcohol every day, don’t immediately go teetotal. Try to cut out alcohol every other day or have a drink once every three days. Also, breaking up the longer-term goal into more manageable short-term goals can be beneficial and more rewarding. The same principle can be applied to exercise or eating more healthily.

Do one thing at a time. One of the easiest routes to failure is to have too many resolutions. If you want to be fitter and healthier, do just one thing at a time. Give up drinking. Give up smoking. Join a gym. Eat more healthily. But don’t do them all at once, just choose one and do your best to stick to it. Once you have got one thing under your control, you can begin a second resolution.

Be SMART. Anyone working in a job that includes setting goals will know that goals should be SMART, that is, specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound. Resolutions shouldn’t be any different. Cutting down alcohol drinking is an admirable goal, but it’s not SMART. Drinking no more than two units of alcohol every other day for one month is a SMART resolution. Connecting the resolution to a specific goal can also be motivating, for example, dropping a dress size or losing two inches off your waistline in time for the next summer holiday.

Tell someone your resolution. Letting family and friends know that you have a New Year’s resolution that you really want to keep will act as both a safety barrier and a face-saver. If you really want to cut down smoking or drinking, real friends won’t put temptation in your way and can help monitor your behaviour. Don’t be afraid to ask for help and support from those around you.

Change your behaviour with others. Trying to change habits on your own can be difficult. For instance, if you and your partner both smoke, drink and eat unhealthily, it is really hard for one partner to change their behaviour if the other is still engaged in the same old bad habits. By having the same resolution, such as going on a diet, the chances of success will improve.

The full article can be found at https://theconversation.com/the-psychology-of-new-years-resolutions-51847 .

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!

Submission Series Season 11 Starts Sep 29!

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Arashi-Do Martial Arts St. Albert has always done very well in the submission series in the short time we’ve been around, hoping to send a big team to all four events this year!

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!

How to Be a Great BJJ Training Partner

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When it comes to the effectiveness of BJJ, many people would say that it’s the techniques that are the key. While this is true, it is incomplete. There are many other styles that teach the same or similar techniques to BJJ but do not have the same track record in MMA or open combat. The key is how these techniques are shaped and sharpened by drilling them against full resistance, and testing them in tournaments against unfamiliar opponents. In this way, it is actually the sport component of BJJ that makes it so effective for self-defense. This means the true value of BJJ is in your training partners. Here are a few tips for taking good care of them:

  1. Understand who the drill is for. In BJJ drilling, usually the drill is more for one person than the other, and you must be sensitive to this. If the class is about mount escapes, it is not the time for you to completely shut down your partner and show how awesome you are at holding mount. It’s easy to counter when you know exactly what the person is supposed to be doing. Let them work through the technique and let the instructor tell you when it’s time to fight.
  2. Focus on improvement. This may seem obvious, but it isn’t. There is a big difference between focusing on getting better, and focusing on showing how good you already are. If you always drill the things you’re already good at and spend all your time rolling in the positions you like, it’s easy to fall into a rut. It’s good every few weeks to assess where you’re feeling good and where you could use improvement, and make an effort to put yourself in those positions you don’t like as much to get better at them.
  3. Communicate. If you have a neck injury or bad knee, don’t be afraid to tell your partner. It is true that BJJ is a tough sport, little aches and pains are always going to be there and you’ll have to work through them but if something is on the edge where you can train with it but it’s at higher risk for further injury, it’s important for your training partner to know. The whole team gets better when everyone stays on the mat and keeps training.

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!

To Pull or not to Pull?

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Guard pulling in Jiu-Jitsu is a polarizing topic and usually goes hand in hand with the debate over whether Jiu-Jitsu is headed down the path of becoming just another sport martial art with no basis in self defense. It’s clear that in a street fight, you don’t want to be fighting from your back on the concrete no matter how good you are at it. If you are put there, you use the skills of Jiu-Jitsu to return to your feet and preferably put the opponent on the ground.

I find myself stuck in the middle. I personally never pull guard and will always teach my students takedowns first, and always emphasize that in self defense you stay on your feet if at all possible. However, I do think it’s important to recognize that pulling guard may be the best strategy for certain types of fighters, especially in lower weight divisions and success in competition is important as well. If one of my students wants to pull guard, I only ask the following:

  1. Pull guard AGGRESSIVELY. Make sure when you go to the ground, the opponent is off-balance and a step behind so you can immediately attack with a sweep or submission.
  2. Train takedowns as well. Pull guard because it’s where you’re most dangerous, not because you don’t know how to do anything else.
  3. Get the RIGHT grips. Don’t be in such a rush to get the fight to the ground that you take whatever grips you get first. The grips you pull guard with should be the ones you need for the sweep or submission you’re going for immediately afterward.

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Give us a call at 780-217-0059 or send us an e-mail at tlarone@arashido.com for more information on joining our team and see the life-changing benefits of training in jiu-jitsu for yourself!